Announcing our Learning Together & Connecting Communities Grant Recipients!

Northwest Health Foundation is thrilled to announce the grant recipients of our Learning Together and Connecting Communities Project.

Grants were awarded to eight organizations: Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO), National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Autism Empowerment, Umpqua Valley disAbilities Network, David’s Harp, Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA), Disability Art and Culture Project, and OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon.

The Learning Together and Connecting Communities Project aims to strengthen the capacity of communities of people with disabilities to organize, and to build relationships among communities for a broader conversation about disability and race, ethnicity and geography.

NWHF Asks the Kids

With the launch of Northwest Health Foundation's Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative, we wanted to speak to some of the key informants of our work. So our summer intern Nadia visited the Boys & Girls Club of Portland Metropolitan Area and asked the kids a couple questions...

We're looking for communications support services

Northwest Health Foundation will select one communications firm, or multiple individual contractors, to provide the following communications support services to our Kaiser Permanente Community Fund grantees. 

Communications Support Services

1) Communications consulting

2) Graphic design

3) Copy writing


Applicants to the RFP can apply to provide one or all of these services. Please submit your applications by October 1. 


Q&A with our summer intern, Nadia Alradhi

Q. How did you end up at Northwest Health Foundation?

A. I actually came to be at NWHF for the summer of 2014 because Nichole [NWHF's President] mentioned the internship program to my Mom (Darla Hilmoe, her executive assistant while at NAYA), who then relayed the message to me. I started volunteering at NAYA in 2010, and I love the sense of community that NAYA provides to the Native American population. That is where I met Nichole, who has provided me with outstanding support both professionally and personally throughout the years. Once I heard of the internship opportunity, I contacted Eddie and was so excited to hear that I would be spending my summer with NWHF!

Q. How do you relate to NWHF's mission?

A. NWHF strives to eliminate health inequities in areas including race/ethnicity, geography, and disability status. Personally, I have faced racial adversity throughout my life as a Native American and Saudi Arabian woman. Because of my experiences, I always strive to create an inclusive and accepting environment around me. These adversities have made me stronger, and I really enjoy finding the silver lining in spinning a negative experience into a positive force for change.

Q. What have you learned from your experience?

A.   I have learned many skills at NWHF, including how to approach a community I may not be familiar with and establishing a relationship, contacting key community members, learning how a site visit is conducted, and seeing firsthand how the grant review process works. I have also learned how to be a self-starter and recognize what important steps need to be taken to make an event successful.  On top of all of that, I have learned dozens of new acronyms! 

Q. If you could make one change in your community, what change would you make?

A.  I would eliminate all forms of “-isms” from my community. I feel like with heavy topics such as racism, sexism, and even “fat-ism” eliminated, positive change would spiral from it and an even more positive and inclusive community would be formed.

Q. What has been your favorite moment at NWHF?

A.  My favorite moment at NWHF actually happens every week. I really enjoy the quirky check-in questions that kick off the weekly staff meetings. The questions have ranged from “What fashion statement is uniquely yours?” to “What scent reminds you of your childhood?” It’s just a fun way to get to know the people at NWHF a bit better, and the answers always provide some laughs.

Q. What are you going to do next?

A.  After my summer with NWHF, I am resuming nursing school at Linfield Good-Samaritan School of Nursing. I will be graduated in August of 2015, and from there I hope to find a full-time job as a registered nurse, hopefully working in a labor and delivery department. I am also going to start a new volunteer experience at the International Center for Traditional Childbearing in a couple of weeks.

Q. If you could combine any two animals, what animals would you combine?

A. I would combine a salmon and an eagle, so that way the seagle (get it?) would be able to swim, live on land, and fly. Plus, both of these animals are noble and respected beings in Native American spirituality and culture.

 

Nadia will finish her internship with NWHF this month. We are so thankful for all of her help this summer, particularly on our Healthy Beginnings + Healthy Communities Initiative and Partners Investing in Nursing's Future. Good luck with your future endeavors, Nadia! Come back and visit!

Why Oregon Should Shelter Child Refugees

We were honored to join with The Collins Foundation in a letter to the editor to express our support for fair, humane treatment of the many children seeking refuge in the U.S. Though our statement didn't make it into the news, we think it's worth sharing:

Every day, our foundations invest in nonprofit organizations and programs to help children in Oregon succeed. Why? Because Oregonians consistently tell us they value our children above all else. They are our future prosperity. What the research shows, and our families know, is that there will be no prosperity if we cannot keep our children safe.

We have been following our nation's growing concern over the influx of child refugees to the U.S. We think that no child should be returned to a home that isn't safe.

When children arrive in Oregon, fleeing violence in Central America, let's treat them as we would our own children in desperate need. While their cases are being heard, we should provide them with shelter and support, not detention. Support programs for child refugees are cheaper and more effective. They are also more Oregonian.

But humane shelter programs are stopgaps if the homes these child refugees would return to are neither safe nor permanent. Until their safety can be assured, these children should be allowed to stay among family, friends or caregivers. Meanwhile, the U.S. and Central America must work together to dramatically reduce the violence causing children to seek protection in neighboring nations.

No matter how long they're with us, we think our community has a responsibility to welcome them and work to improve their young lives. We think much of Oregon agrees.

- Truman Collins, President of The Collins Foundation; Cynthia Addams, Executive Vice President of The Collins Foundation; Reverend Mark Knutson, Chair of Northwest Health Foundation; and Nichole June Maher, President & CEO of Northwest Health Foundation

HB+HC Organizing Grant Application Period Open!

Northwest Health Foundation is thrilled to announce that our Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Organizing Grant Request for Proposals has been finalized, and the application period for Organizing Grants is now open!

Full application instructions are available in the RFP:

 

Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative will help communities improve health, from birth to high school, by 2020. Organizing Grants will equip 30 communities (self-identified by geography, identity, and/or experience) to organize themselves in preparation for five-year Community-Based Partnerships by providing $20,000-$30,000 funding per community, as well as creating opportunities to build relationships and gain exposure to essential concepts about early life and health, policy, advocacy, leadership development and other objectives to be identified by participants.

After the year-long Organizing Grant period is over, the 30 self-identified communities will have the chance to apply for five-year Community-Based Partnerships, of which ten will be awarded. These ten communities will receive $50,000 to $150,000 per community each year for five years (for a total of $250,000-$750,000) to build the community alliances that will drive Healthy Beginnings+Health Communities objectives. By 2020, we will have achieved measurable results both in building community capacity for improving health and in making positive improvements to physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being from pre-birth to ninth grade. 

 

Thank you to everyone who attended Outreach Sessions and gave us feedback on our draft RFP! The final RFP has been greatly improved by your input.

If you have not yet had the chance to attend an Outreach Session to learn more about Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities, do not fear! There are more coming up. Please check our website for dates and locations. Or, you can watch our recorded webinar here.

OHA wants your feedback on CCO incentive measures

Give your organization a voice and participate in Oregon Health Authority’s survey on coordinated care organization (CCO) incentive measures. This survey solicits feedback on existing incentive measures and suggestions for new measures. Results will inform the Metrics & Scoring Committee’s selection of the CCO incentive measures for 2015, the third measurement year. Act fast! The survey closes tomorrow: June 6, 2014.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2015Measures

Organizations can submit multiple responses. If you have any questions about the survey or the feedback process, or would like to submit any additional information, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at sarah.e.bartelmann@state.or.us.