The Aschenbrener Center for Philanthropy provides a shared office environment for foundations and other members of the philanthropic community.

Northwest Health Foundation established the Center for Philanthropy, located in Portland’s historic Old Town / Chinatown neighborhood, to support and strengthen the region’s philanthropic sector by facilitating greater collaboration and learning among a diverse group of funders and organizations.

Tenants of the Center for Philanthropy occupy renovated suites in the three-story, 30,000-square-foot facility, and enjoy access to several conference rooms and basic administrative support.

Northwest Health Foundation is the owner of the building and occupies a portion of the third floor.

Our other tenants include:

Our meeting rooms are named after local social justice heroes. You can read their bios below.


Photo from The Oregon History Project

Photo from The Oregon History Project

Beatrice Morrow Cannady (1890-1974)

Beatrice Morrow Cannady was a civil rights activist and founding member of Portland’s branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She used her position as editor of the Advocate, Oregon’s largest African American newspaper, to defend the rights of African Americans in Oregon and southwest Washington.

Read more about Beatrice.

 

 

 
Photo from OregonLive.com

Photo from OregonLive.com

Arthur Honeyman, MFA (1940-2008)

Arthur Honeyman was a prolific essayist, poet, publisher and disability rights activist who did things his own way. Among his life adventures: running for Oregon’s state legislature twice on a platform of “Spastic Power,” shuffling his wheelchair from Portland to Salem along the freeway to protest the lack of disabled access on buses and springing his mother out of a mental institution.

Read more about Art.

 
Photo from The Oregon Historical Society

Photo from The Oregon Historical Society

Iwao Oyama (1886-1952)

Iwao Oyama edited and published Oshu Nippo, the primary Japanese language newspaper in Oregon, from 1917-1951. On the afternoon of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Iwao Oyama was arrested and his printing press confiscated. Nevertheless, as soon as World War II ended, he returned to Portland and resumed publishing Oshu Nippo with a typewriter and mimeograph machine.

Read more about Iwao.

 

 

 
Photo from www.gofundme.com/zys6nnr8

Photo from www.gofundme.com/zys6nnr8

Melissa Sarabia (1988-2015)

Melissa Sarabia was studying to be an immigration lawyer at Lewis & Clark Law School. She acted as an advocate for educational justice for undocumented youth and would often testify on behalf of DREAMers. Melissa’s family believes she was motivated to protect others’ rights and help them overcome their life obstacles due to her own experience with cystic fibrosis.

Read more about Melissa.

 
Photo from day1.org

Photo from day1.org

Reverend Ramona Soto Rank (1944-2007)

Reverend Ramona Soto Rank was an enrolled member of the Klamath Tribes of Oregon and the first Native American woman to be ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. As a leader in both American Indian/Alaska Native communities and the Lutheran Church, Ramona strongly supported Native American rights for sovereignty and self-determination.

Read more about Ramona.