James Manning: I'm Not a Politician; I'm a Public Servant.

This blog is the third in a series of posts celebrating community leaders who reflect our equity priorities. At Northwest Health Foundation, we know communities need the power and resources to sit at decision-making tables, to help dispel beliefs and practices that do not promote their health, and to help shape those that do. From local school boards to the state legislature, parents and families should have a voice.

Photo portrait of Senator James Manning.

Senator James Manning doesn’t think of himself as a politician. He’s a public servant, and he’s been a public servant for a long time.

Before becoming involved in Oregon government, Senator Manning worked as a state corrections officer, police officer, railroad special agent and private investigator. In 1983, he enlisted in the United States Army. After 24 years of active duty, during which he filled many roles, including everything from Military Diplomat to the Australian and New Zealand Special Forces to Postal Supervisor to U.S. Army Assistant Inspector General, Senator Manning retired in 2007 and moved to Eugene.

In retirement, Senator Manning felt the urge to give back to his community. He quickly got involved with nonprofits like United Way for Lane County. He also served on the City of Eugene’s Police Commission and was appointed by two Oregon governors to the Oregon Commission on Black Affairs. Then, in 2016, he campaigned to represent District 14 in Oregon’s House of Representatives.

Senator James Manning lost in the primaries to Representative Julie Fahey. However, he didn’t consider his campaign a waste of time; he enjoyed it. He liked going door to door, taking the time to hear from community members. In particular, he appreciated the opportunity to talk with elderly community members. He recalled one woman who took a while to get to the door, who he soon realized hadn’t been eating and set her up with Meals on Wheels, as well as a man who he spent 20 minutes with, although he was only supposed to take three minutes with each voter.

After his loss in the primaries, Senator Manning assumed he’d go back to doing what he’d been doing: serving on commissions and committees and working towards a doctor of education in organizational leadership. That’s what he did, for a while. At least until the Lane County Board of Commissioners unexpectedly appointed him to replace outgoing Senator Chris Edwards in December 2016.

What are Senator James Manning’s priorities as an elected official? Listening and responding to people’s needs. Living wages. Good jobs. Quality, affordable healthcare. Refusing to leave senior citizens and children behind. Senator Manning has pledged not to make a vote that will hurt people.

As a child, Senator Manning sometimes went to bed hungry. At times, he was homeless. Now, he wants to be an inspiration to people who feel like there is no hope. He wants to inspire people to seize opportunities and give back to others.

His advice to others who are think about running for office: It has to be about helping people, not about personal gain. Visit places that don’t feel familiar to you. Visit schools. Pay attention to the kids huddled outside, waiting for their first meal of the day. Build up name recognition, and then just do it.

How We Lost the Vote But Won the Day, The Story of the 2013 Portland Pro-Fluoride Campaign

Cartoon teeth holding picket signs.

In 2013, a coalition of funders, community-led nonprofits, advisors and other allies came together to campaign for water fluoridation in Portland, OR. Although the ballot initiative did not pass, the campaign succeeded in helping community-based organizations build capacity for civic engagement. In this article, we share our experiences from the campaign, the obstacles we encountered and our lessons learned.

Oregon Minimum Wage, Boiled Down

Current Minimum Wage

$9.25 an hour

Cost of Living

That depends on who you ask. According to the Economic Policy Institute's 2014 Family Budget Calculator, a living wage for a family of four ranges between $14/hour and $17/hour, depending on the county. The National Low Income Housing Coalition estimates a "rental wage" between $13/hour and $18/hour in order for a family to afford rent on a two-bedroom home. And the University of Washington's 2014 Self Sufficiency Standard suggests a living wage between $9/hour and $16/hour for a family of four.

There are two coalitions advocating for a higher minimum wage in 2016.

Raise the Wage Oregon proposes a state minimum wage of at least $13.50/hour, implemented by 2019. They specifically require that the legislation include farmworkers and restaurant workers. They also want to change the rules so that Oregon localities can set a higher minimum wage than the state minimum wage. (For instance, the City of Portland could set a $15/hour minimum wage, on top of the state baseline of $13.50/hour.)

15 Now Oregon demands a $15/hour minimum wage throughout the state, implemented by 2019.

Both coalitions hope that the February 2016 legislative session will resolve the issue. If not, though, both coalitions are working on gathering 10,000 signatures each so that they can qualify for the ballot measure titling process for November 2016.

Where does Northwest Health Foundation stand on the issue?

About a third of all jobs in Oregon pay less than $13.00 per hour, which for most Oregon families is not enough to pay for basic needs like housing, transportation, food and child care. We also know that costs to live in Oregon depend on where you live in the state, and that small, rural economies aren't the same as large, urban economies. 

Before we support any one approach to raising the minimum wage, we want to understand the issues better. We joined with North Star Civic Foundation to have conversations with communities throughout Oregon last week, and we're looking at all kinds of data as well. Keep an eye on this blog; we’ll report what we learn here in early November.

 

Upcoming Conferences, October-November 2015

 

Oral Health in the New Age of Aging | October 2

Perspectives on epigenetics, gerontology and chronic disease. Hosted by Oregon Oral Health Coalition in Portland, OR.

 

Black Parenting Symposium | October 3

We are the village. Hosted by Black Parent Initiative at Warner Pacific College.

 

School Health Conference | October 8-9

Creating cultures of wellness. Hosted by Oregon School-Based Health Alliance in Portland, OR.

 

9th International Black Midwives and Healers Conference | October 9-11

Honoring our past, embracing our future. Hosted by International Center for Traditional Childbearing in Portland, OR.

 

Social Capital Research to Action Symposium | October 21

Increasing social capital to improve the health and well-being of our communities. Hosted by Institute for Sustainable Solutions and Center for Public Health Studies at Portland State University in Portland, OR.

 

RE: Conference | October 29-30

RE: Conference is for anyone with a mind for expanding opportunity in Oregon. Hosted by Neighborhood Partnerships in Salem, OR.

 

Oregon Public Health Association Conference & Meeting | October 12-13

Where will public health in our state go next? Hosted by the Oregon Public Health Association in Corvallis, Oregon.

 

CCO Tech & Data Conference | November 10

The changing needs of technology and data for successful coordinated care transformation. Hosted by CCO Oregon in Salem, Oregon.

 

Pathways to Health Equity | November 16

Success means getting there together. Hosted by the Oregon Health Authority Office of Equity and Inclusion in Portland, Oregon.

 

Coordinated Care Model Summit | November 17

Share outcomes and lessons learned, and inspire future innovation in Oregon. Hosted by the Oregon Health Authority Transformation Center in Portland, OR.

 

Behavioral Health System Town Halls |October 2 & 7; November 4, 9 & 20

This one's not technically a conference, but we still think it's important for you all to know about. Oregon Health Authority is seeking input from adolescents, adults and families who have had difficulties accessing mental health and substance use disorder treatment in Oregon.

 

Let us know if we're missing a conference! Comment below or email laura@northwesthealth.org.



Mini-grant Mondays

What are Mini-grant Mondays?

Every Monday in July Northwest Health Foundation will announce the winner of a mini-grant worth $100 on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

How can my organization enter?

Follow Northwest Health Foundation on Facebook and/or Twitter. On July 1st we will announce the beginning of the contest. All you have to do to enter is either (1) tell us what your organization will use the money for by commenting on our weekly Mini-grant Monday Facebook post, or (2) tell us what your organization will use the money for by tweeting to @northwesthealth with the hashtag #minigrantmonday.

We will announce our winners at the end of the day on Monday July 6th, 13th, 20th and 27th.

What can my organization do with the money?

Anything you want! You could pay for transportation to an event or advocacy day at the capitol. You could compensate community members for time spent participating in a focus group or advisory board. You could offer childcare at a community organizing meeting or event. You could buy flip charts, colored markers or other office supplies. Or...you tell us. The sky is the limit! (And nonprofit tax laws, of course.)

How will Northwest Health Foundation choose the winners?

We will select winners based on (1) how well your organization fits our guiding principles and commitment to equity and (2) your plan for spending the mini-grant.

Anything else I need to know?

You must be a registered nonprofit organization (501(c)3 or 501(c)4) working with communities in Oregon or Southwest Washington to enter. Mini-grants will be awarded in the form of Visa gift cards.

 

This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed, administered by or associated with Facebook or Twitter.

 

Video: NWHF Asks the Communities

Our HB+HC Organizing Grant Communities answered these questions: What does health mean to you? What does community capacity mean to you? How can we help communities improve health?

Watch the video to find out how they answered.

NWHF Asks the Kids

With the launch of Northwest Health Foundation's Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative, we wanted to speak to some of the key informants of our work. So our summer intern Nadia visited the Boys & Girls Club of Portland Metropolitan Area and asked the kids a couple questions...

Hello from our new Community Engagement Officers

We are excited to introduce you to our newest team members!

Jen Matheson and Michael Reyes Andrillon will help guide our grantmaking and community building.

We recorded their hellos this week. They'll be traveling throughout Oregon and SW Washington meeting our past, current and future partners. Meet them in this video, or in your community this Spring!

2013 Year in Review

2013 WAS A MOMENTOUS YEAR OF CHANGE FOR NORTHWEST HEALTH FOUNDATION.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We welcomed new colleagues, took on new challenges, and set a long- term direction for the foundation. We committed to deeper partnerships, true statewide & SW Washington service, and a nimble foundation focused on action. Below is a snapshot of our 2013 activities.  None of these are possible without the work done by our many community partners committed to advancing a broad vision of community health across Oregon and SW Washington. Thank you!

WE CLARIFIED OUR COMMITMENT AND SET OUR DIRECTION.

  • Our board of directors committed to a long-term endowment strategy to serve our communities for generations to come.
  • We recommitted ourselves to serving our entire service area of Oregon and SW Washington and set about building relationships in new areas.
  • We adopted a five-year strategic initiative, Healthy Beginnings, Healthy Communities, to guide our endowed investments through 2018.
  • We joined with Kaiser Permanente to focus the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund in three key areas of economic opportunity, educational attainment and healthy beginnings.
  • We committed to using all of our tools and resources to further our mission including Mission-Related Investments and explicit minority and women contracting policies.
NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a  Playworks  site visit.

NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a Playworks site visit.

WE CELEBRATED OUR PAST AND WELCOMED OUR FUTURE.

  • We celebrated the contributions and future of departing staff members and welcomed new staff leadership.
  • We built a board and staff that is representative of Oregon and Southwest Washington by age, race, geographic roots, and LGBTQ identities.
  • When asked by them, we joined an organized, committed coalition of community organizations working to fluoridate Portland's water.
  • We committed to increasing our policy advocacy capacity and investments to change health outcomes.
  • We honored health care transformation in making our final investments  within our committed healthcare reform cohort.
  • We supported 150 Community Advisory Council members in attending the Coordinated Care Organization's Summit.

WE PURSUED LEARNING IN NEW COMMUNITIES.

  • We pursued deeper understanding of the continuum of disability to increase relationships and opportunities to partner.
  • We chartered the Board Community Engagement Committee and Equity Committee to oversee, advise and engage in our work across Oregon’s diverse communities.
  • We sponsored a task force to bring stakeholders on both sides of water fluoridation to study actionable oral health improvement programs.
  We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

 We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

WE INCREASED OUR REACH.

  • We created an open sponsorship process to expand our support for community events in rural communities, communities of color and organizations led by and serving people with disabilities.
  • We visited communities in Benton, Clackamas, Clark, Clatsop, Coos, Cowlitz, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Pacific, Washington and Yamhill Counties to build relationships and understand their vision for health.
  • Beyond statewide-impact grants, we made grants serving more than 63% of counties in our service area of Oregon and SW Washington.

OUR FUNDED PARTNERS

Innovation Fund

American Leadership Forum of Oregon
The ARC of Benton County
Basic Rights Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Chinook Indian Nation
City Club of Portland
City of Brookings
Committee for Safe and Successful Children
Consejo Hispano del Lower Columbia
Coos County Public Health
Forest Grove School District
The Jessie F. Richardson Foundation
Klamath Crisis Center
Klamath Youth Development Center
Leightman Maxey Foundation
The Lund Report
McKenzie River Gathering Foundation
Miracle Theatre Group
Muslim Educational Trust
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon Voice
Playworks
Portland State University Foundation
Potlatch Foundation
Togo Community in Oregon

Health Care Reform

American Academy of Family Physicians - Oregon Chapter
American Heart Association
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Association of Oregon Community Mental Health Programs
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Central City Concern
Children First for Oregon
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
Health Care for ALL - Oregon
Human Services Coalition of Oregon
Main Street Alliance of Oregon
NAMI-Oregon
NorthEast Oregon Network
Oregon Action
Oregon Center for Public Policy
Oregon Coalition of Local Health Officials
Oregon Developmental Disabilities Coalition
Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Primary Care Association
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Rural Health Association
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG)
Portland Youth and Elders Council
Sisters of the Road
The Next Door Inc.
The-TREE Institute
Tobacco-Free Coalition of Oregon
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better

Kaiser Permanente Community Fund

Albina Ministerial Alliance
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
Centro Cultural of Washington County
Coalition of Communities of Color
Colin McCormack
Cowlitz County Community Network
Craft3
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon
Hacienda Community Development Corporation
Incight Company
Latino Business Alliance
Latino Network
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
OneAmerica
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Pathfinders of Oregon
Playworks
REACH Community Development, Inc.
Urban League of Portland
Verde

Water Fluoridation

Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Coalition of Communities of Color
Healthy Kids, Healthy Portland
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Latino Network
Native American Youth and Family Center
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Voice
Upstream Public Health
Urban League of Portland

Sponsorships

All Hands Raised
Asian Health and Service Center
"Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce of Oregon and Southwest
Washington (APACC)"
Basic Rights Education Fund
Bay Area Hospital
Cascade Pacific Resource Conservation & Development
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Women, Politics & Policy, Portland State University
City of Portland Bureau of Transportation
City of Vancouver
CoActive Connections
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
"Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
Portland Alumae Chapter"
DisOrient Asian American Film Festival of Oregon
Ecotrust
Familias en Accion
Family Access Network Foundation
Family Building Blocks
Financial Beginnings
Future Generations Collaborative
Highlands Neighborhood Association
Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Incight Company
International Center for Traditional Childbearing
J Bar J Youth Services
Ke Kukui Foundation
Kukatonon Children’s African Dance Troupe
Latino Network
Legacy Health System
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
Mano A Mano Family Center
Momentum Alliance
Native American Youth and Family Center
North Coast Food Web
Office of Rural Health, OHSU
Old Mill Center for Children and Families
Options for Southern Oregon
Oregon Area Jewish Committee
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Organizing People, Activating Leaders (OPAL)
Playworks
Providence Milwaukie Foundation
Red Lodge Transition Services
ShelterCare
Skamania Klickitat Community Network
Southern Coos Health Foundation
Spect-Actors Collective
Ten Rivers Food Web
The Asian Reporter Foundation
United Way of Jackson County
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better
Willamette Farm and Food Coalition
Womenspace, Inc.

Oregon Youth Photo Contest Opens Feb 1

2013 entry by Stephanie of Beaverton H.S.

2013 entry by Stephanie of Beaverton H.S.

As part of Oregon Public Health Week, Northwest Health Foundation and the Oregon Public Health Division are pleased to sponsor the 2014 Oregon Youth Photo Contest.

The contest opens on February 1, 2014 and closes on February 28, 2014 at 11:59pm.

So, pick up your camera and capture your own ideas of what health for everyone looks like!