Meet our new board members: Cyreena, Jorge and Mechele!

In December, we said goodbye to our board chair, Vanetta Abdellatif, and board members, Dr. Robbie Law and Carl Talton. They are incredible people. We can't thank them enough for their thoughtful guidance over the last eight years.

Fortunately, we have three promising new board members to take their place.

Cyreena Boston Ashby

Cyreena Boston Ashby

Jorge Gutierrez

Jorge Gutierrez

Mechele Johnson

Mechele Johnson

Cyreena Boston Ashby is Oregon Public Health Institute's chief executive officer. She's worked with U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley and Governor John Kitzhaber, and most recently directed the Portland African American Leadership Forum.

Read more about Cyreena.

Jorge Gutierrez is the executive director of Lower Columbia Hispanic Council. He is involved not just with managing the organization but also participates in the day-to-day delivery of services.

Read more about Jorge. 

Mechele Johnson has served as a Shoalwater Bay tribal council woman and organized as a part of Willapa Bay Resistance, a grassroots cross-racial coalition that recruits candidates to run for office and builds the voices of low-income people of color and rural Washingtonians.

Read more about Mechele.

At Northwest Health Foundation, we believe the staff and board of an organization should not only be experts in their fields, but reflect the communities they serve. Cyreena, Jorge and Mechele are community leaders and strong advocates for health across Oregon and Southwest Washington. We look forward to the expertise and perspective they bring to our board.

In addition, board member Dr. Phil Wu will take over for Vanetta Abdellatif as board chair; Michael Alexander will take over as vice chair; and Donalda Dodson will serve as secretary.

Introducing Our New Board Member, Kenneth Hart

In 2017 we welcome one new member to our governing board as three step down. We are inexpressibly grateful to Leda Garside, Becky Graham and Helena Huang for their years of service and the mark they have made on Northwest Health Foundation. Needless to say, we are sad to see them go. However, we are also excited to welcome Kenneth Hart.

Talton_Carl.jpg

Ken Hart is a certified public accountant and President of Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Ontario. He is deeply involved in his eastern Oregon community.

Read more about Ken...

We look forward to learning more about Ken's perspective and the impact he will make on the Foundation!

In addition, board member Bill Thorndike will take over for Becky Graham as Treasurer, joining Chair Vanetta Abdellatif, Vice Chair Phil Wu and Secretary Michael Alexander as a board officer. 

Introducing our New Board Officers

Our staff leadership team and 2015 board, with a couple faces missing.

Our staff leadership team and 2015 board, with a couple faces missing.

NWHF is excited to announce its board officers!

Vanetta Abdellatif follows Rev. Mark Knutson as chair. Vanetta currently directs Integrated Clinical Services at Multnomah County Health Department. She served as vice chair on our board for the last two years. We know she will lead our board with aplomb!

Philip Wu, MD is our new vice chair. Phil is retired from Kaiser Permanente of Tualitin, where he worked as a pediatric obesity specialist. He's been with our board since 2012.

Michael Alexander, MSS follows Carl Talton as board secretary. After a varied career across sectors, Michael recently retired from the Urban League of Portland, where he served as President and Chief Executive Officer.

Rebecca Graham continues as the board's treasurer. Rebecca, a retired Certified Public Accountant, has proven her skills as a treasurer again and again!

If you haven't met the rest of our board, meet them here.

We are so honored and humbled by the great work of our board, and the work that each member does in our community. In 2016, as we embark on our first year of Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Collaborate; as we facilitate our last Kaiser Permanente Community Fund proposal process; as we dig deeper into conversations about our equity priorities of disability and geography; and as we foster existing and new funding partnerships, this is the board we want to lead us! 

 

 

A Letter from Outgoing Board Chair Rev. W.J. Mark Knutson

Recently I returned from a National Summit on Welcoming the Syrian Refugee in Detroit, Michigan. It was an inspiring summit focused on hospitality and hope in a time in this nation when people of goodwill must speak out.

On the Sunday after my return, I was surprised to the core by a celebration of 20 years as Pastor of Augustana Lutheran Church in Portland. It has been a journey in which we have grown from a small congregation to a large multicultural, multinational, multigenerational welcoming and affirming sanctuary congregation of justice seekers and peacemakers.

For nine of those 20 years, I have had the gift of serving on the board of the Northwest Health Foundation during a period in which Advocacy and Social Justice have been embraced.

Central to the work of the Northwest Health Foundation and the church is a vision of what is intended for the human family where all can fully live and give of themselves for the common good. At the heart of this vision are deep relationships that remind us we are all called to step out for social justice when others may hold back. To be unafraid and willing to take risks, since it is not about us but about the community and world in which we live, is vitally important.

The Northwest Health Foundation has championed a vision of what can and must be for children, families and communities in Oregon and Southwest Washington with the Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative. It has been a vision forged with communities themselves where the gifts and answers are already present. A majority minority board and staff, strong and collaborative partnerships with communities of color, diverse volunteer citizen lobbyists: these are intentional steps in a vision grounded in a commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion. The courageous leadership of President and CEO Nichole June Maher, and a board and staff that truly love and care for each other and our communities, have been vital in this process. Incoming board chair Vanetta Abdellatif knows this well.

If we are to live into the vision we so desire where all are welcome and can truly have life in healthy communities, it will take intentional daily steps with boldness and courage. There will always be voices that say it is impossible, but we know better. If organizations of all types from philanthropy to faith communities, from non-profits to schools, from businesses to government, answer the call to become the diverse and equitable organizations that reflect who we are not only today but 20 years from now, real change will come. The gifts and the knowledge are already present in our communities, and that makes all things possible. Yes, the best is yet to come. 

Sincerely,

Rev. W.J. Mark Knutson

Q&A with NWHF Board Member, Andrea Miller

Photo portrait of Andrea Miller.

Q. What is a day like in the life of Andrea Miller?

A. Every day I get to meet new people, work on some of the most pressing issues in Oregon, and put into practice my values of equity and justice for all. I consider myself pretty lucky. This kind of work, however, is non-stop, and the hours can be erratic—working on the weekends and evenings. The key to my daily productivity and sustainability in this work is the 30 to 45 minutes I take in the morning to exercise. It helps to clear my head and get me ready to take on the day.

Q. What would you consider the most important bills that passed in the 2015 legislative session?

A. So many important bills passed in the 2015 legislative session, it's hard for me to label one as "the most important." From where I sit as the director of Causa, I will say that there are several bills that will have a significant impact on communities of color. One of those is the Paid Sick Days bill, which will allow nearly half a million Oregonians to earn sick days so that they can take a day off of work to care for a sick child or themselves without having to miss a day of pay. Considering that 60% of Latino workers did not have access to one paid sick day before this bill, this is monumental. The other one is the End Profiling bill, which bans the practice of profiling as a law enforcement tactic. Oregon will soon shift to community policing, a more effective public safety strategy that fosters trust between law enforcement officers and communities.  People in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color are targeted the most, leading to higher arrest and conviction rates among people of color generally—and African-Americans specifically. The End Profiling bill is a step in the right direction, as local communities across the nation struggle with the correlation between police violence and communities of color.

Q. What are Causa's goals this year, and how are you working to meet them?

A. (1) Make progress on statewide policies that impact Latino families during the legislative session. (2) Defend against proposed statewide policies that don’t support equity for all Oregonians. (3) Support immigrants through the processes of naturalization and deferred action status and serve as a resource hub for immigrant families seeking relief.

So how've we done so far?

(1) During the legislative session, 2 out of 5 bills on Causa’s legislative agenda became law. Our strategy to make that happen was two-fold: train and mobilize people directly impacted by the issue to voice their support for the bill, and participate in strong coalitions that support our priority bills. The coalitions we were a part of included the Oregon Health Equity Alliance and the Fair Shot Coalition, both of which had significant wins last session.

(2) The same group that put Measure 88 on the ballot has filed two initiative petitions that will negatively impact communities of color. Causa and our partners have convened a broad coalition to proactively counteract the effort to qualify two ballot measures for the 2016 election.

(3) Causa holds naturalization and DACA workshops to help individuals fill out their application free of cost or at a low-cost with attorney assistance. We’ve also launched a bilingual website and Facebook page called Oregon Immigration Resource to widely distribute resources, updates, and information about administrative relief and other immigration programs.

Q. What are next steps for immigration reform since DAPA passed?

A. Unfortunately, we can’t turn our attention away from the immigration administrative relief that Obama made possible just yet. The executive action is being challenged in the courts by a group of states that disagree with Obama’s administrative changes. Causa and our national partners are doing all we can to advocate for the deferred action programs to move forward so that the immigrant parents of U.S. born children can apply for protection from deportation, work authorization and, in Oregon, get a driver license. Ultimately, we’ll keep advocating for Congressional action on immigration reform long-term, but first we need to secure the small victory that was made in 2015 with the expansion of the deferred action program.

Q. How does your role on the NWHF board compliment your work at Causa, and vice versa?

A. The relationships I’ve built through Causa, and my experience as a past [NWHF] grantee, inform my decision making with the Community Engagement Committee at NWHF. I’m in a very privileged position where I both get to be part of philanthropy that supports equity initiatives and a practitioner of on-the-ground advocacy and organizing work. I get to see both the 1,000-foot level and the 10-foot level of this larger work, which sharpens my abilities both at Causa and NWHF.

Q. How do you identify with NWHF's guiding values and equity priorities?

A. One of NWHF’s guiding principles I identify with most is, “Promoting upstream, systemic change through advocacy is often the most effective strategy for improving community health.” One of the reasons I started working at Causa is because I saw advocacy and policy change as a way to make big and long lasting impact for Oregon families. NWHF invests in organizations that seek systemic change, and that's a very intentional and long-term commitment. It can be difficult to see the results of your work when we’re talking about system change, but it pays off in the long run by closing the gap on health, education, economic and other disparities among Oregon’s diverse communities.

Q. What drew you to Oregon?

A. I was born in Eugene and raised in Salem, Oregon. While I’ve grown up here, I’ve chosen to make Oregon my home and start a career here. Growing up, there were so many pressures to leave and explore new states and cities, and to this day I still get asked why I never left or if I have plans to leave in the future. I love Oregon—our trees, our people, our communities. Oregon and the leaders that live here have allowed me so many opportunities to grow in my professional and personal life. I can’t imagine myself living anywhere else.

Q. What is your favorite place in the U.S. outside of Oregon?

A. Maui, Hawaii. There are obvious reasons why that would be the case for nearly anyone—the gorgeous beaches, the weather. But Maui is my favorite place in the U.S. besides Oregon because it is my second home. My family has lived in Hawaii for five generations. My grandma, grandpa, aunts, uncles and cousins all live there. I try to visit every other year. I’m very lucky to have roots in such a beautiful part of our country.

Q&A with NWHF Board Member, Phil Wu

Phil participated in our first ever Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Gathering on March 9, 10 and 11 at Kahneeta Resort & Spa in Warm Springs, OR. Here's what he thought about it:

Q. What did you takeaway from the HB+HC Organizing Grant Communities Gathering in March?

A. We had twenty-five very diverse communities from all parts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, and every community identified and expressed a unique challenge they intend to meet with passion, commitment and leadership. For me, the Gathering highlighted the fact that for many communities the HB+HC framework (or health compass) is a different way of thinking about their work, and they are just at the beginning of the process. Not all of their thoughts have crystallized, nor can they answer all of the questions posed by the compass.

Q. Who did you meet at the Gathering?

A. It was a whirlwind! I wish I could remember every person and conversation that I experienced during the two days, but this won't be possible. For me, it was great to see some names and faces from organizations that I already know. On the other hand, meeting smart, thoughtful and dedicated people from across the state was inspirational.

Q. What stories did you hear that stuck in your mind?

A. While every story is significant, hearing the voices of youth expressed through the Momentum Alliance always tugs at my heart!

Q. What was the most impactful part of the Gathering for you?

A. For me, two parts: First, the small group exercise at the beginning of the Gathering during which tables of five or six grappled with a "blank" HB+HC health compass was telling! For many at that point there were more questions than answers, and this provoked significant thought! Second, I thought the concept of "power" was identified and effectively framed throughout the Gathering.

Q. What was your favorite part of the Gathering?

A. Again, two parts: First, the four-minute stories introducing each community were inspirational and fun! Second, I could have done nothing more during the two days than share food and have open-ended chats!

Q. What are you excited about for the future of the Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative?

A. For me what's most exciting is the building of capacity and "power" of the various communities almost regardless of the outcomes they achieve. And most importantly, a framework will have been created that will help continue the work beyond the Initiative itself.

And, bonus questions!

Q. What is a day like in the life of Phil Wu?

A. OMG! One day is never like the next! With my "semi-retired" status, my days are filled with activities that I truly WANT to do. These include my commitments to Northwest Health Foundation, Community Benefit at Kaiser Permanente and other community endeavors. I also always include time for swimming, walking and cycling, and I always think about great coffee, bread, beer and wine!

Q. What is your favorite cartoon character?

A. I used to draw a variation of Pig Pen: A curious character with a head completely covered in long, unkempt hair, big protruding hands and feet, and no body! This must be an alter ego.

Q&A with New Board Member, Marjorie McGee

Q.  When and how did you first become involved with NWHF?

A.  I first learned about NWHF in 2004/05 when I went to a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) Conference hosted by Northwest Health Foundation. This conference was my first exposure to CBPR and NWHF. I became very interested in CBPR, particularly with the emphasis on equity in the research processes and on making research relevant to communities. Later I worked on the steering committee for the 2006 NWHF CBPR Conference. 

Q.  As a new NWHF board member, what are you most excited about?

A.  I am really very excited about the Learning Together and Connecting Communities initiative with the inclusion of disability as an axis of diversity (and not just a health outcome to prevent). I especially appreciate the focus by NWHF on making it easier for marginalized communities to build capacity within their communities to address the social and health inequities. I am looking forward to being a part of this work and to learning more from other NWHF board members, staff and partners in the process. 

Q. How do you relate to NWHF's mission and values?

A.  As a member of a community, I am accustomed to well-intentioned organizations working in ways that are very disempowering. NWHF values of equity and mission in building community capacity to improve health and reduce health inequities resonates with my own values. 

Q.  What is a day like in the life of Marjorie McGee?

A. I usually start my day with coffee and the New York Times. Then on to work. I try to focus on the mental tasks first thing, which for me usually means working on a research project. If it’s a gym day, I go to the gym; otherwise it’s a short lunch and back to the office for more work. Then I go home and have dinner with my partner. We try to have some down time together at the end of each day chatting and watching Netflix or something on TV. 

Q.  If you could change one thing in your community, what would you change?

A. People’s lives are complex. Because of that complexity we have to restrain our eagerness to simplify that complexity.

Q. If you could only eat one type of food for the rest of your life, what would you choose?

A. Japanese food. Itadakimasu!

Q. What is your ideal vacation?

A. I love quietness, nature, photography, culture, learning and exploration. Thus my ideal vacation is combining all of that, with periods for rest and reflection. Usually sea kayaking fills this desire. Or traveling abroad. The best vacation is when I am able to recharge my batteries, so to speak. 

Introducing Our Two New Board Members

In 2015 we welcome two new members to our governing board: Andrea Miller and Marjorie McGee, Ph.D. They fill spots left by Mark Hass and Jim Meyer, who stepped down at the end of 2014.

 

Andrea became the Executive Director of Causa, Oregon's statewide Latino immigrant rights organization in September 2013. Prior to her current role, she was Causa's Associate Director and has been with the organization since 2009.

Read more about Andrea...

 

Marjorie is a disability studies scholar who received her doctorate in Social Work and Social Research at PSU. She currently works as a Research Associate in the Center for Student Success in the Graduate School of Education at PSU, where she conducts research intended to address the problem of educational inequities.

Read more about Marjorie...

 

We're excited to learn more about Andrea and Marjorie's diverse perspectives and look forward to their impact on the Foundation.

Q&A with our Equity Committee Chair, Darleen Ortega

Ortega_Darleen.jpg

Q. How did you get involved in Northwest Health Foundation?

A. I was recruited to the board. I am not sure how my name came up.

Q. What is your role on NWHF's board?

A. Currently I serve as chair of the Equity Committee, and also as a member of the Community Engagement Committee.

Q.  What have you learned so far from NWHF’s Learning Together & Connecting Communities project?

 

A.  It has been very inspiring to learn about some of the amazing work that is being done to address the needs of people with disabilities. Also, I think my thinking has deepened a lot about how important it is to treat persons with disabilities as whole persons and not just make their disability the focus. That sounds so obvious when you say it, but it is a common mistake that I have made myself.

Q.  How do you think the Learning Together & Connecting Communities project will change NWHF’s foundational practices?

A.  It is not enough to have the intention to fund more of the work of organizations who work with people with disabilities. Without relationships, we leave our own blind spots intact and cannot make decisions that are likely to have the most impact. We need to empower others who have been working for a long time on such issues to broaden their impact and find ways to collaborate. I think this project will help us be a more effective participant in work that has already been done. It will help us to ask better questions of others and ourselves. 

Q.  What has been your favorite moment at NWHF?

A.  There are so many.  I really doubted what I could contribute early on but have found work to do that is deeply meaningful to me. I still doubt how much I have contributed but am so grateful for the opportunity to work on equity issues in an organization that is really willing to ask hard questions and work on such issues. NWHF is often the only place I can ask certain questions or raise certain issues and not pay a heavy price, and have some hope of others engaging with those questions and issues.

Q.  How do you relate to NWHF’s mission and values?

A.  I have spent my career harboring deep concern for the overlooked experiences and needs of oppressed and underrepresented communities. Most of my work has been in the arena of law, but NWHF has deepened my awareness of the health impacts of the same disparities that have troubled me for my entire career.

Q.  What do you do for your day job?

A.  I am a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals.  I preside over a panel of three judges and we review all kinds of cases that come through the state courts and administrative agencies.

Q.  How do you define “health?”

A.  My idea of health includes the whole person: their physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being.  Health also includes all that is true about a given individual: his or her cultural context, family of origin, gender and sexual identity, and physical gifts and limitations. All of us need healing from time-to-time, but we don't need fixing. We do need understanding.

Q.  If you could change one thing in your community, what would you change?

A.  I would like for all of my communities to be more genuinely embracing of difference and to be constantly interested in hearing perspectives that are currently unrepresented or have been historically underpresented.

Q.  Would you rather be a deep sea diver or an astronaut?

A. An astronaut.

 

2013 Year in Review

2013 WAS A MOMENTOUS YEAR OF CHANGE FOR NORTHWEST HEALTH FOUNDATION.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We welcomed new colleagues, took on new challenges, and set a long- term direction for the foundation. We committed to deeper partnerships, true statewide & SW Washington service, and a nimble foundation focused on action. Below is a snapshot of our 2013 activities.  None of these are possible without the work done by our many community partners committed to advancing a broad vision of community health across Oregon and SW Washington. Thank you!

WE CLARIFIED OUR COMMITMENT AND SET OUR DIRECTION.

  • Our board of directors committed to a long-term endowment strategy to serve our communities for generations to come.
  • We recommitted ourselves to serving our entire service area of Oregon and SW Washington and set about building relationships in new areas.
  • We adopted a five-year strategic initiative, Healthy Beginnings, Healthy Communities, to guide our endowed investments through 2018.
  • We joined with Kaiser Permanente to focus the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund in three key areas of economic opportunity, educational attainment and healthy beginnings.
  • We committed to using all of our tools and resources to further our mission including Mission-Related Investments and explicit minority and women contracting policies.
NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a  Playworks  site visit.

NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a Playworks site visit.

WE CELEBRATED OUR PAST AND WELCOMED OUR FUTURE.

  • We celebrated the contributions and future of departing staff members and welcomed new staff leadership.
  • We built a board and staff that is representative of Oregon and Southwest Washington by age, race, geographic roots, and LGBTQ identities.
  • When asked by them, we joined an organized, committed coalition of community organizations working to fluoridate Portland's water.
  • We committed to increasing our policy advocacy capacity and investments to change health outcomes.
  • We honored health care transformation in making our final investments  within our committed healthcare reform cohort.
  • We supported 150 Community Advisory Council members in attending the Coordinated Care Organization's Summit.

WE PURSUED LEARNING IN NEW COMMUNITIES.

  • We pursued deeper understanding of the continuum of disability to increase relationships and opportunities to partner.
  • We chartered the Board Community Engagement Committee and Equity Committee to oversee, advise and engage in our work across Oregon’s diverse communities.
  • We sponsored a task force to bring stakeholders on both sides of water fluoridation to study actionable oral health improvement programs.
  We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

 We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

WE INCREASED OUR REACH.

  • We created an open sponsorship process to expand our support for community events in rural communities, communities of color and organizations led by and serving people with disabilities.
  • We visited communities in Benton, Clackamas, Clark, Clatsop, Coos, Cowlitz, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Pacific, Washington and Yamhill Counties to build relationships and understand their vision for health.
  • Beyond statewide-impact grants, we made grants serving more than 63% of counties in our service area of Oregon and SW Washington.

OUR FUNDED PARTNERS

Innovation Fund

American Leadership Forum of Oregon
The ARC of Benton County
Basic Rights Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Chinook Indian Nation
City Club of Portland
City of Brookings
Committee for Safe and Successful Children
Consejo Hispano del Lower Columbia
Coos County Public Health
Forest Grove School District
The Jessie F. Richardson Foundation
Klamath Crisis Center
Klamath Youth Development Center
Leightman Maxey Foundation
The Lund Report
McKenzie River Gathering Foundation
Miracle Theatre Group
Muslim Educational Trust
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon Voice
Playworks
Portland State University Foundation
Potlatch Foundation
Togo Community in Oregon

Health Care Reform

American Academy of Family Physicians - Oregon Chapter
American Heart Association
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Association of Oregon Community Mental Health Programs
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Central City Concern
Children First for Oregon
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
Health Care for ALL - Oregon
Human Services Coalition of Oregon
Main Street Alliance of Oregon
NAMI-Oregon
NorthEast Oregon Network
Oregon Action
Oregon Center for Public Policy
Oregon Coalition of Local Health Officials
Oregon Developmental Disabilities Coalition
Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Primary Care Association
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Rural Health Association
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG)
Portland Youth and Elders Council
Sisters of the Road
The Next Door Inc.
The-TREE Institute
Tobacco-Free Coalition of Oregon
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better

Kaiser Permanente Community Fund

Albina Ministerial Alliance
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
Centro Cultural of Washington County
Coalition of Communities of Color
Colin McCormack
Cowlitz County Community Network
Craft3
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon
Hacienda Community Development Corporation
Incight Company
Latino Business Alliance
Latino Network
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
OneAmerica
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Pathfinders of Oregon
Playworks
REACH Community Development, Inc.
Urban League of Portland
Verde

Water Fluoridation

Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Coalition of Communities of Color
Healthy Kids, Healthy Portland
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Latino Network
Native American Youth and Family Center
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Voice
Upstream Public Health
Urban League of Portland

Sponsorships

All Hands Raised
Asian Health and Service Center
"Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce of Oregon and Southwest
Washington (APACC)"
Basic Rights Education Fund
Bay Area Hospital
Cascade Pacific Resource Conservation & Development
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Women, Politics & Policy, Portland State University
City of Portland Bureau of Transportation
City of Vancouver
CoActive Connections
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
"Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
Portland Alumae Chapter"
DisOrient Asian American Film Festival of Oregon
Ecotrust
Familias en Accion
Family Access Network Foundation
Family Building Blocks
Financial Beginnings
Future Generations Collaborative
Highlands Neighborhood Association
Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Incight Company
International Center for Traditional Childbearing
J Bar J Youth Services
Ke Kukui Foundation
Kukatonon Children’s African Dance Troupe
Latino Network
Legacy Health System
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
Mano A Mano Family Center
Momentum Alliance
Native American Youth and Family Center
North Coast Food Web
Office of Rural Health, OHSU
Old Mill Center for Children and Families
Options for Southern Oregon
Oregon Area Jewish Committee
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Organizing People, Activating Leaders (OPAL)
Playworks
Providence Milwaukie Foundation
Red Lodge Transition Services
ShelterCare
Skamania Klickitat Community Network
Southern Coos Health Foundation
Spect-Actors Collective
Ten Rivers Food Web
The Asian Reporter Foundation
United Way of Jackson County
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better
Willamette Farm and Food Coalition
Womenspace, Inc.

Michael Alexander, Bill Thorndike named to NWHF board

Michael Alexander, Bill Thorndike named to NWHF board

Northwest Health Foundation named Michael Alexander and Bill Thorndike to its governing board of directors. The Foundation named Reverend W.J. Mark Knutson Chair of the board of directors.


Alexander is President and Chief Executive Officer of Urban League of Portland. Thorndike runs his family business, Medford Fabrication, a custom steel fabrication company. Rev. Knutson serves as pastor of Augustana Lutheran Church in Portland for more than 15 years.

Read More

Board Member Darleen Ortega in the news

Transient

Our board member, Darleen Ortega, was profiled in today's Oregonian. Oregon and Northwest Health Foundation are lucky to have her!

From the story:

As a child, Darleen Ortega loved to read. She devoured books in school and dreamed of one day writing some of her own.

Now as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals, Ortega has, in a way, fulfilled that dream. Appellate decisions -- though dry -- are human stories, she jokes.

Ortega's own story touches on perseverance and the power of diverse perspectives. She is the first Latina and woman of color on the appellate court. Leading by example, she is working to diversify the field of law in Oregon. 

Ortega, 51, was born in California and grew up near Banks from age 10. Her family, a Mexican American mom, Caucasian dad, sister and two adopted African American brothers, was diverse -- an anomaly in the small community of Manning. It was a stark change from life in Los Angeles.

Read the rest here.