Q&A with our Vice President of Finance, Jason Hilton

Q. How did you end up at Northwest Health Foundation?

A. Well, Nichole really wanted a colleague of mine for this position. As I was helping her vet this opportunity against her passions and desired skill set, she elected to pass. However, through the process it became clear to both of us that my skill set and abilities could add value to the organization. So I did some research on Nichole and the history of the organization and pursued the opportunity.

Q. Describe a day in the life of Jason.

A. I wake up, feed my labraweenie and drive to work. I spend my mornings reviewing and reconciling investment activity and reviewing our cash needs. Usually by 10:30 a.m. I am working on a problem with the building. The afternoons are dedicated to strategic process improvement and impact investing. Then I go home and feed my labraweenie.

Q. What are your goals for your work at NWHF? What do you hope to accomplish?

A. To help maximize the impact of Northwest Health Foundation by devising innovative impact investing strategies, improving managerial tools and contributing to the strategic vision of NWHF.

Q. What has been your favorite moment at NWHF so far?

A. (1) On a trip to Curry County getting to spend fireside time with colleagues discussing each other's personal and professional journeys. (2) My first day at NWHF we participated in a kickball tournament for Playworks. It was a great way to interact with the NWHF team and see how bad philanthropists are at athletic events. I was convinced that part of the decision to hire me may have been to help the kickball team.

Q. What was the hardest part of creating NWHF's 2015 budget?

A. Predicting the allocation of time and grant activity across the numerous donor advised programs we service on behalf of our funding partners.

Q. What is your best piece of financial advice?

A. Don't get lost in the woods. Keep focused on the big picture.

Q. What is your best piece of fishing advice?

A. Go fishing during the week, not on the weekends. I'm jealous of people who can do that regularly.

Q. What is your favorite part of the holidays? Least favorite?

A. My favorite part of the holidays is creating memories with loved ones. My least favorite is shopping.

Q. Do you have a New Years resolution for 2015?

A. To exercise more and take my daughters rafting.

Q&A with our Grants Administrator, Fannie Black

Q. Describe a day in the life of Fannie.

A typical day starts with emails and phone calls: responding to inquiries about funding opportunities, resolving issues with our grantee portals or answering/asking questions related to specific grants. Even at times when we don’t have active grant cycles, there is still so much to do. Of course there are also meetings, and the ones I really enjoy are with our community partners, because that’s where I get to learn more about the great work our partners are doing. Those meetings also give me the opportunity to get to know the people doing that work and what inspires and motivates them.

These days I’ve been spending a lot of time on a data migration project. We’re moving our grants management system to a new platform. It’s probably not exciting for most people, but it’s been exciting for me to learn something new and create a more user friendly process for our staff and community partners.

There is also a lot of laughter thrown in there too throughout the day. We love to laugh in the office!

Q. What do you enjoy most about working at NWHF?

I really enjoy learning about our community partners and the work that they’re doing. Before coming to the Foundation, I really wasn’t aware of all the nonprofits in Oregon and SW Washington doing amazing work to improve the overall health of the region. There were some organizations I was familiar with, but I didn’t know what they actually did. It’s also great to see how those organizations partner with each other to make their visions a reality.

I also enjoy working with my colleagues here at the Foundation, as I said before, we love to laugh in the office. We don’t just get along here. The care and respect we have for each other shows every day in how we engage and work with each other. I think the teasing and joking around helps us keep a good balance of work and play in the office. Although our days are busy, we find time to throw some fun in the mix.

Q. How are you currently involved with the Healthy Beginnings+Healthy Communities Initiative?

As the Grant Administrator, I handle a lot of the behind the scenes work to bring our grant opportunities to our partners. From building the grant application, to resolving any technical issues, to ensuring applications are complete, and finally generating grant agreements, I am involved before the grant cycle opens and well after it closes.

Q. If you could change any one thing in your community, what would you change?

My “community” is always expanding. As a multiracial individual, I am part of multiple communities of color, and as an Alaskan my geographic community has expanded to Oregon. Among all of these communities there are some unique issues each faces, but there are some overlapping issues, around social inequity for example, that I would like to see changed. Since coming to the Foundation, I’ve learned so much about the external factors that impact one’s health and the health of communities. One change I would like to see is for the focus of health to be more holistic and community-focused rather than just focused on an individual’s physical health. Our social and physical environment, families, education, access to healthy food options, access to parks, access to affordable healthcare... all of these things impact our health. When focusing just on the physical health of an individual, you miss the whole picture by not taking into account all of those other factors that we may not necessarily have control of.

Q. How do you relate to NWHF’s mission?

The Foundation’s holistic vision of health and support of community-led solutions definitely resonates with me personally. As a Yup’ik Eskimo, a lot of our traditional cultural practices promote and support a healthy lifestyle. Those practices are not only physical, but emotional, spiritual and environmental. For example, subsistence hunting touches on all of these aspects. You have to be physically fit to hunt for wild game. When you get your first catch it is celebrated and the food is shared with the community. You give thanks for a successful hunt, and you don’t hunt for more than what you need. When someone doesn’t have the ability or resources to hunt for their food, they are not forgotten but are supported by the community. I feel very fortunate to be a part of an organization that has a mission and values that align with my own.

Q. What was/is your favorite subject in school?

A. I love math. I looked forward to doing my math homework, and then I chose a college degree where I got to do math all the time. I don’t get to do much math in my graduate studies, but when I do I definitely look forward to it. In my 5th grade class we had these timed math tests: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with a bunch of problems. You had to see how many you could complete in the time allotted, and of those how many you got correct. It always came down to me and one other student.

I loved those quizzes! And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I recreated them when I was in college, and I’ve recently thought about doing that again. I actually have a couple friends who are interested in taking them with me. It’ll be fun, and I play to win!

Q.  If you had a theme song, what would it be?

A. So I have a friend that loves to sing that “Take a load off Fannie” song to me almost every time we see each other. It’s kind of become my song now, so many people have sung it to me, and I just love that it inspires people to serenade me! So please, sing away!

I have to be honest though. I’ve never really paid attention to the lyrics, but I definitely connect with the chorus line. I don’t just love it because it has my name in it. We all feel the weight of things every day, in our personal and work lives, and sometimes it’s not easy to lighten that weight, or there may be factors that are out of your control. But, having colleagues or friends and family that can help lighten that load is so important. I feel fortunate that I have that kind of support here at the Foundation.

 

Q&A with our summer intern, Nadia Alradhi

Q. How did you end up at Northwest Health Foundation?

A. I actually came to be at NWHF for the summer of 2014 because Nichole [NWHF's President] mentioned the internship program to my Mom (Darla Hilmoe, her executive assistant while at NAYA), who then relayed the message to me. I started volunteering at NAYA in 2010, and I love the sense of community that NAYA provides to the Native American population. That is where I met Nichole, who has provided me with outstanding support both professionally and personally throughout the years. Once I heard of the internship opportunity, I contacted Eddie and was so excited to hear that I would be spending my summer with NWHF!

Q. How do you relate to NWHF's mission?

A. NWHF strives to eliminate health inequities in areas including race/ethnicity, geography, and disability status. Personally, I have faced racial adversity throughout my life as a Native American and Saudi Arabian woman. Because of my experiences, I always strive to create an inclusive and accepting environment around me. These adversities have made me stronger, and I really enjoy finding the silver lining in spinning a negative experience into a positive force for change.

Q. What have you learned from your experience?

A.   I have learned many skills at NWHF, including how to approach a community I may not be familiar with and establishing a relationship, contacting key community members, learning how a site visit is conducted, and seeing firsthand how the grant review process works. I have also learned how to be a self-starter and recognize what important steps need to be taken to make an event successful.  On top of all of that, I have learned dozens of new acronyms! 

Q. If you could make one change in your community, what change would you make?

A.  I would eliminate all forms of “-isms” from my community. I feel like with heavy topics such as racism, sexism, and even “fat-ism” eliminated, positive change would spiral from it and an even more positive and inclusive community would be formed.

Q. What has been your favorite moment at NWHF?

A.  My favorite moment at NWHF actually happens every week. I really enjoy the quirky check-in questions that kick off the weekly staff meetings. The questions have ranged from “What fashion statement is uniquely yours?” to “What scent reminds you of your childhood?” It’s just a fun way to get to know the people at NWHF a bit better, and the answers always provide some laughs.

Q. What are you going to do next?

A.  After my summer with NWHF, I am resuming nursing school at Linfield Good-Samaritan School of Nursing. I will be graduated in August of 2015, and from there I hope to find a full-time job as a registered nurse, hopefully working in a labor and delivery department. I am also going to start a new volunteer experience at the International Center for Traditional Childbearing in a couple of weeks.

Q. If you could combine any two animals, what animals would you combine?

A. I would combine a salmon and an eagle, so that way the seagle (get it?) would be able to swim, live on land, and fly. Plus, both of these animals are noble and respected beings in Native American spirituality and culture.

 

Nadia will finish her internship with NWHF this month. We are so thankful for all of her help this summer, particularly on our Healthy Beginnings + Healthy Communities Initiative and Partners Investing in Nursing's Future. Good luck with your future endeavors, Nadia! Come back and visit!

NWHF Names Jason Hilton new Vice President of Finance

Northwest Health Foundation is thrilled to announce that we have found a new Vice President of Finance: Jason Hilton.   

Jason comes to us from Capital Pacific Bank where he currently serves as Senior Vice President, providing leadership and strategic support to their mission-related investment efforts. 

Northwest Health Foundation will use all of the tools in our toolbox, including mission-related investing, to advance health for Oregon and Southwest Washington. Jason's experience in this field, along with his skills in asset management and finance, means that we've landed the perfect person for this job. 

A native Oregonian, Jason grew up in Jacksonville and attended South Medford High School. He left the state for college, obtaining his bachelor's degree in business and finance, with a minor in economics, from the University of Montana. After college, Jason returned to Oregon to work for US Bancorp Securities, then US Bank, as a corporate credit analyst. In 1999, he joined a locally-owned financial services company where he rose to the position of Chief Operating Officer and eventually helped facilitate its sale to a publicly traded company. He joined Capital Pacific Bank in 2008 as a Portfolio Manager and Client Relations Officer, rising to his current position of Senior Vice President, overseeing a team that addresses troubled companies and bank-owned real estate. Outside of his career, Jason also co-founded a local nonprofit that focuses on aiding orphanages that rescue children from the slave trade.

Jason will start at NWHF on July 1st, succeeding NWHF's founding Vice President of Finance David Hooff who joined the Foundation in 1999 and is retiring after a 45-year career in financial management. Dave has been an irreplaceable part of NWHF's team and its legacy. He will be greatly missed!

 

Hello from our new Community Engagement Officers

We are excited to introduce you to our newest team members!

Jen Matheson and Michael Reyes Andrillon will help guide our grantmaking and community building.

We recorded their hellos this week. They'll be traveling throughout Oregon and SW Washington meeting our past, current and future partners. Meet them in this video, or in your community this Spring!

We're seeking a Vice President of Finance

Northwest Health Foundation (NWHF) has initiated a search for the Vice President of Finance. 

Due to the retirement of our long serving Vice President, David Hooff, we are seeking a seasoned finance and accounting leader and manager who will actively oversee our investment strategies and activities.  The VP will administer the Foundation’s $70 million corpus to advance, support and promote the health of the people of Oregon and Southwest Washington.  Ideally, this key individual will possess strong generalist skills with the ability to assess, manage and grow people, systems, and strategies while working with a diverse staff and board.  The VP will work with the Board’s Finance Committee and President to direct the organization’s investment portfolio as well as contribute to expanding external partnerships.

This excellent opportunity requires that the successful candidate align with NWHF’s mission, core values and cultural vision. S/he will offer demonstrated staff leadership and mentoring; exceptional financial, accounting, and investment literacy; external relationship management experience; and personal traits such as uncompromising ethics, strong interpersonal skills, a sense of humor and a team spirit.

Download a profile of the position here. 

Should you have personal interest or know of networking or referral sources, please contact:

Tyler Kendall | TylerK@tkaes.com | 503 936-0894 (direct)

OR

Melissa Ulum | Melissa@MSSsearch.com | 503-643-0440 (direct) | 503-730-7615 (mobile)

2013 Year in Review

2013 WAS A MOMENTOUS YEAR OF CHANGE FOR NORTHWEST HEALTH FOUNDATION.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We supported more than 30 community partners in their efforts to fluoridate Portland's water.

We welcomed new colleagues, took on new challenges, and set a long- term direction for the foundation. We committed to deeper partnerships, true statewide & SW Washington service, and a nimble foundation focused on action. Below is a snapshot of our 2013 activities.  None of these are possible without the work done by our many community partners committed to advancing a broad vision of community health across Oregon and SW Washington. Thank you!

WE CLARIFIED OUR COMMITMENT AND SET OUR DIRECTION.

  • Our board of directors committed to a long-term endowment strategy to serve our communities for generations to come.
  • We recommitted ourselves to serving our entire service area of Oregon and SW Washington and set about building relationships in new areas.
  • We adopted a five-year strategic initiative, Healthy Beginnings, Healthy Communities, to guide our endowed investments through 2018.
  • We joined with Kaiser Permanente to focus the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund in three key areas of economic opportunity, educational attainment and healthy beginnings.
  • We committed to using all of our tools and resources to further our mission including Mission-Related Investments and explicit minority and women contracting policies.
NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a  Playworks  site visit.

NWHF President Nichole Maher joins Grout Elementary students in a game of foursquare during a Playworks site visit.

WE CELEBRATED OUR PAST AND WELCOMED OUR FUTURE.

  • We celebrated the contributions and future of departing staff members and welcomed new staff leadership.
  • We built a board and staff that is representative of Oregon and Southwest Washington by age, race, geographic roots, and LGBTQ identities.
  • When asked by them, we joined an organized, committed coalition of community organizations working to fluoridate Portland's water.
  • We committed to increasing our policy advocacy capacity and investments to change health outcomes.
  • We honored health care transformation in making our final investments  within our committed healthcare reform cohort.
  • We supported 150 Community Advisory Council members in attending the Coordinated Care Organization's Summit.

WE PURSUED LEARNING IN NEW COMMUNITIES.

  • We pursued deeper understanding of the continuum of disability to increase relationships and opportunities to partner.
  • We chartered the Board Community Engagement Committee and Equity Committee to oversee, advise and engage in our work across Oregon’s diverse communities.
  • We sponsored a task force to bring stakeholders on both sides of water fluoridation to study actionable oral health improvement programs.
  We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

 We visited 17 counties to hear their vision for health.

WE INCREASED OUR REACH.

  • We created an open sponsorship process to expand our support for community events in rural communities, communities of color and organizations led by and serving people with disabilities.
  • We visited communities in Benton, Clackamas, Clark, Clatsop, Coos, Cowlitz, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Pacific, Washington and Yamhill Counties to build relationships and understand their vision for health.
  • Beyond statewide-impact grants, we made grants serving more than 63% of counties in our service area of Oregon and SW Washington.

OUR FUNDED PARTNERS

Innovation Fund

American Leadership Forum of Oregon
The ARC of Benton County
Basic Rights Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Chinook Indian Nation
City Club of Portland
City of Brookings
Committee for Safe and Successful Children
Consejo Hispano del Lower Columbia
Coos County Public Health
Forest Grove School District
The Jessie F. Richardson Foundation
Klamath Crisis Center
Klamath Youth Development Center
Leightman Maxey Foundation
The Lund Report
McKenzie River Gathering Foundation
Miracle Theatre Group
Muslim Educational Trust
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon Voice
Playworks
Portland State University Foundation
Potlatch Foundation
Togo Community in Oregon

Health Care Reform

American Academy of Family Physicians - Oregon Chapter
American Heart Association
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Association of Oregon Community Mental Health Programs
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Central City Concern
Children First for Oregon
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
Health Care for ALL - Oregon
Human Services Coalition of Oregon
Main Street Alliance of Oregon
NAMI-Oregon
NorthEast Oregon Network
Oregon Action
Oregon Center for Public Policy
Oregon Coalition of Local Health Officials
Oregon Developmental Disabilities Coalition
Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Primary Care Association
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Rural Health Association
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG)
Portland Youth and Elders Council
Sisters of the Road
The Next Door Inc.
The-TREE Institute
Tobacco-Free Coalition of Oregon
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better

Kaiser Permanente Community Fund

Albina Ministerial Alliance
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
Centro Cultural of Washington County
Coalition of Communities of Color
Colin McCormack
Cowlitz County Community Network
Craft3
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon
Hacienda Community Development Corporation
Incight Company
Latino Business Alliance
Latino Network
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
OneAmerica
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Pathfinders of Oregon
Playworks
REACH Community Development, Inc.
Urban League of Portland
Verde

Water Fluoridation

Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO)
Coalition of Communities of Color
Healthy Kids, Healthy Portland
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Latino Network
Native American Youth and Family Center
Oregon Latino Health Coalition
Oregon Voice
Upstream Public Health
Urban League of Portland

Sponsorships

All Hands Raised
Asian Health and Service Center
"Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce of Oregon and Southwest
Washington (APACC)"
Basic Rights Education Fund
Bay Area Hospital
Cascade Pacific Resource Conservation & Development
Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette and Central Coast
CAUSA Oregon
Center for Women, Politics & Policy, Portland State University
City of Portland Bureau of Transportation
City of Vancouver
CoActive Connections
Coalition of Community Health Clinics
"Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
Portland Alumae Chapter"
DisOrient Asian American Film Festival of Oregon
Ecotrust
Familias en Accion
Family Access Network Foundation
Family Building Blocks
Financial Beginnings
Future Generations Collaborative
Highlands Neighborhood Association
Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber
Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Incight Company
International Center for Traditional Childbearing
J Bar J Youth Services
Ke Kukui Foundation
Kukatonon Children’s African Dance Troupe
Latino Network
Legacy Health System
LGBTQ Community Center Fund
Mano A Mano Family Center
Momentum Alliance
Native American Youth and Family Center
North Coast Food Web
Office of Rural Health, OHSU
Old Mill Center for Children and Families
Options for Southern Oregon
Oregon Area Jewish Committee
Oregon Oral Health Coalition
Oregon Public Health Association
Oregon Public Health Institute
Oregon School-Based Health Care Network
Organizing People, Activating Leaders (OPAL)
Playworks
Providence Milwaukie Foundation
Red Lodge Transition Services
ShelterCare
Skamania Klickitat Community Network
Southern Coos Health Foundation
Spect-Actors Collective
Ten Rivers Food Web
The Asian Reporter Foundation
United Way of Jackson County
Urban League of Portland
We Can Do Better
Willamette Farm and Food Coalition
Womenspace, Inc.

Jesse Beason to Join NWHF as Director of Public Affairs

Northwest Health Foundation has named Jesse Beason Director of Public Affairs. Beason is currently executive director of Proud Ground, a Portland-based nonprofit. Beason will join the Foundation on August 1. He succeeds Chris Palmedo, who leaves the Foundation on April 5 to complete his doctoral degree at Portland State University.

Read the press release here.